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It's 59-60 degrees Farenheit in Pennsylvania two days after Christmas. This is global warming, folks. There are few places in the lower 48 where winter tires are still needed. In the USA, there may be some towns along the Canadian border, and maybe for a week or two in and around the Rockies, but otherwise such tires are unnecessary. I doubt if PA, NJ, NY, DE, MD, and 35 other states will experience more than a single storm which should be cleared rather quickly by state authorities if they are any good. In 90% of winter days around here until next spring, the roads will be devoid of snow and ice. I've never had winter tires. Fifteen winters in Minnesota and eleven in Pennsylvania. With global warming, winter tires will rapidly go the way of the abacus.

It's like Miami out there today!
 

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It's 59-60 degrees Farenheit in Pennsylvania two days after Christmas. This is global warming, folks. There are few places in the lower 48 where winter tires are still needed. In the USA, there may be some towns along the Canadian border, and maybe for a week or two in and around the Rockies, but otherwise such tires are unnecessary. I doubt if PA, NJ, NY, DE, MD, and 35 other states will experience more than a single storm which should be cleared rather quickly by state authorities if they are any good. In 90% of winter days around here until next spring, the roads will be devoid of snow and ice. I've never had winter tires. Fifteen winters in Minnesota and eleven in Pennsylvania. With global warming, winter tires will rapidly go the way of the abacus.

It's like Miami out there today!

Boy I'd love for you to see any mountain town in Colorado, all winter and into May and try the I-70 gauntlet to the Front Range ski areas on a Saturday. Your statement is just untrue above about 7,500 feet. ;) Also just spent 5 days in Rochester, NY and driving around the Finger Lakes a bit. Also untrue there as well.
 

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Boy I'd love for you to see any mountain town in Colorado, all winter and into May and try the I-70 gauntlet to the Front Range ski areas on a Saturday. Your statement is just untrue above about 7,500 feet. ;) Also just spent 5 days in Rochester, NY and driving around the Finger Lakes a bit. Also untrue there as well.
Yup. Like I said, places in and around the Rockies and close to the Canadian border can probably use them: Rochester, Buffalo, Niagra Falls, etc. But there is no reason to panic and grab winters and chains in PA or NJ or NYC. If we get more than six inches of snow the entire winter, I'll be surprised. But if some folks insist on winter tires where they aren't needed, that's their business. It's their car.
 

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We will get Snow. It's only a matter of time.
 

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I was up in Mass when they got just a little bit of snow, still on my summers, and it was unbearable. Went sliding through a red light even after giving myself plenty of time to stop. Getting in and out of my buddies driveway which is perpendicular to a hill was a nightmare.
 

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We have had 6 to 8 inches of snow fall 3 times in the last month. The all weather 20 inch tires handled it with no problem. I have to admit that I was quite surprised. And I am glad we got the snow as I was considering buying winter tires. Fortunately there are no hills around here or I am sure I would be have a different opinion.
 
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It's 59-60 degrees Farenheit in Pennsylvania two days after Christmas. This is global warming, folks. There are few places in the lower 48 where winter tires are still needed. In the USA, there may be some towns along the Canadian border, and maybe for a week or two in and around the Rockies, but otherwise such tires are unnecessary. I doubt if PA, NJ, NY, DE, MD, and 35 other states will experience more than a single storm which should be cleared rather quickly by state authorities if they are any good. In 90% of winter days around here until next spring, the roads will be devoid of snow and ice. I've never had winter tires. Fifteen winters in Minnesota and eleven in Pennsylvania. With global warming, winter tires will rapidly go the way of the abacus.

It's like Miami out there today!
I beg to differ. Come visit us in NW Pa near Erie. Although there is a current warm up, we still have up to a foot of snow on the lawns. Snow tires have saved me from getting stuck in my unplowed driveway on my way to work last week and I'm sure will again as winter progresses!
 
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It's 59-60 degrees Farenheit in Pennsylvania two days after Christmas. This is global warming, folks. There are few places in the lower 48 where winter tires are still needed. In the USA, there may be some towns along the Canadian border, and maybe for a week or two in and around the Rockies, but otherwise such tires are unnecessary. I doubt if PA, NJ, NY, DE, MD, and 35 other states will experience more than a single storm which should be cleared rather quickly by state authorities if they are any good. In 90% of winter days around here until next spring, the roads will be devoid of snow and ice. I've never had winter tires. Fifteen winters in Minnesota and eleven in Pennsylvania. With global warming, winter tires will rapidly go the way of the abacus.

It's like Miami out there today!
Oh boy you get a nice warm day around here, and Trek starts chirping about winter tires again:)

Those of us that choose to use winter tires are probably not going to change. Although they may only be needed a couple times per year in our area, I feel a lot more confident, safe, and able to navigate in any winter conditions that occur (including ice, which we get more than snow around our area) with my winters.
Rave on Mr All-seasons ;)
 

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Yup. Like I said, places in and around the Rockies and close to the Canadian border can probably use them: Rochester, Buffalo, Niagra Falls, etc. But there is no reason to panic and grab winters and chains in PA or NJ or NYC. If we get more than six inches of snow the entire winter, I'll be surprised. But if some folks insist on winter tires where they aren't needed, that's their business. It's their car.
I use dedicated snows in Northern Nevada as All Seasons don't grip as well as Winters at low temps, even on dry pavement. Add to that the Winter's grip on slushy-to-powdery mountain roads and you've got two great advantages. I was in chain controls 5 of the last 7 days with clueless Cali cars driving to the nearby ski resort.

People who drive in the snow frequently can do well with All Seasons, but if your budget allows, you will appreciate the extra grip. An added feature: You can get some trick wheels with Summer rubber.
 

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I don't need them 90% of the time living in the Denver burbs but the few times that I'm heading up into the mountains make it worthwhile. At about $1k/yr and assuming a 3 season lifespan the expense is trivial and the piece of mind is well worth it.

It's more of a mindset thing. I also wore, in hindsight, a completely unnecessary full kevlar suite when riding motorcycles. Never needed it but I was glad I had it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I was up in Mass when they got just a little bit of snow, still on my summers, and it was unbearable. Went sliding through a red light even after giving myself plenty of time to stop. Getting in and out of my buddies driveway which is perpendicular to a hill was a nightmare.
That's exactly why you should've switched to All-Seasons like I did. Why are you still driving on summers?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I use dedicated snows in Northern Nevada as All Seasons don't grip as well as Winters at low temps, even on dry pavement. Add to that the Winter's grip on slushy-to-powdery mountain roads and you've got two great advantages. I was in chain controls 5 of the last 7 days with clueless Cali cars driving to the nearby ski resort.

People who drive in the snow frequently can do well with All Seasons, but if your budget allows, you will appreciate the extra grip. An added feature: You can get some trick wheels with Summer rubber.
Very true. I drove in snow a lot in Minnesota, always with All Seasons, so I guess I just learned how to do it safely. But this warm-up is no joke. Regarding of where you are politically, global warming is about science not politics. This planet is changing. One day Maine will feel like Miami. None of us will be alive but it is coming. And no one will be using winter tires. :)
 

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Typically people who drive with summers in snow or even cold weather (under 40) have no clue about the dangers. Some people really think a tire is a tire...very dangerous way of thinking.
It's quite amazing the number of people I've met who are "enthusiasts" but don't know what manufacturer, size or type of tire they're running - much less the specifics like tread pattern, acceptable depth, speed rating, load rating, etc.

It's not hard to believe I've met many Mustang owners like that too. ;)
 

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I learnt my lesson on summer tires in a mild snow shower in NORTHERN Ohio in cold wintry weather they are actually lethal. Having experienced the complete lack of control summer tires in winter in some states should be illegal.

On winter tires some people seem to forget that winter tires are not just for snow but for cold conditions (<40F) where the winter tire rubber is a softer compound and gives more grip. It's not just about snow.

If you keep your car for 2 tires worth of time then you can have a winter and summer set for same price as two all seasons and get the benefit of both.
 

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Clearly, winter tires perform better than all seasons in snow, but I have gotten by fine with all seasons on an AWD car. However, in my experience, these 20" Goodyears perform like summer tires in snow and especially ice. I'm considering switching to the 20" Continental DWS06, which rates extremely well in snow and ice for an all season tire (as Trek knows). The problem is that I'm leasing and am thinking that this will be a monumental waste of money. Of course the other thing is that the tread life on these gargabe Goodyears is supposed to be ridiculously short, so I may need to replace them later on the in the lease anyway.
 

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You should see a half inch fall in Seattle, practically paralyses the city. Not much point in snow tires here but some years ago in a colder area I ran a winter wheel/tire combo. Not just for traction but it seems like you manage to find a surprise in the snow every once in a while and I preferred to take the damage on an el cheapo wheel if it came to it.

I don't miss the snow... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Just realized today how much noisier my all-seasons are compared to my summer tires. I can only imagine how noisy winter tires must be on warm dry pavement.
 

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Just realized today how much noisier my all-seasons are compared to my summer tires. I can only imagine how noisy winter tires must be on warm dry pavement.
I don't find my winter tires to be that noisy. I notice it when I first put them on, but then it becomes a non issue really.
I would love to compare the noise from your AS tires to my full on winters.
But it would not be a fair comparison, since I don't have them on my FP right now. They are on my beater.
Maybe next fall we can do it :)
 
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