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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wanted to relate my experiences on selecting diesel fuel. The conclusion first: buy fuel from a high volume dealer, which typically is also the cheapest dealer!
I've had diesel trucks for over 20 years. At one point I had a go-round with a Dodge dealer unfamiliar with diesels where "hard starting" was blamed on "cheap gas". Turned out to be an air leak in the fuel pump (ended up diagnosing it myself), but in the meantime I spent money having the fuel tank removed and cleaned. It was spotless.
I've noticed that the diesel delivery trucks pump a very light amber color of fuel (there is a clear window in their high-volume hose connector which lets you see). It picks up color as it gets contaminants from the station storage tanks. The longer that fuel sits in those tanks the more likely it is to pick up contaminants.
The gas station near my old neighborhood charged a high price for diesel, and they preyed on local luxury car owners. When I talked with the station owner, he claimed that he had "better fuel", but the suppliers are the same as for other stations and the high prices meant that he held fuel in his tanks longer, giving it a chance to get more contaminated.
I'm in Southern California, which is typically dry and mild. Not sure if other regions would have different considerations when choosing a fuel dealer. What is your experience?
 
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I had a trucking business, and have owned 3 diesel VWs and a few Diesel Ford F250s in my time. I find good fuel a necessity. When I had fuel tanks, I only bought from one company, and never had a fuel problem. After I sold the trucking company, and had to use gas stations, I found I got up to 50 miles per tank more using Meijers (Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, and I believe Wisconsin) or top tiered stations over Speedway fuel.
Gas buddy has stations rated as top tier.
On my diesel vehicles, I use Power serve anti gell, (3 ounces per fill up) in the winter months, just because it is cheap insurance not to be frozen up on the road. I also only use top tier fuel, or Meijers fuel that I find has been very good, even though gas buddy doesn't have them as top tier.


Now some information on the new low sulfur diesel fuel, it forms a algae when left sitting. Before the low sulfur fuel, the sulfur tended to kill the algae. Power serve has a product called Bio Kleen that prevents the algae from growing if you store diesel fuel. 
I have a Kubota tractor, and stored 5 gallons of diesel in a can for when I needed to fuel the tractor. It sat for months and I was going thru fuel filters every 6 months, and that is how I found the problem was the fuel. The screen on the fuel can spout was loaded with algae.
You won’t have a problem if you continuously use your diesel and fuel up every few weeks, but my tractor gets fueled probably twice a year, and holds 5 gallons. I now use Bio Kleen in every fuel up of the tractor, and only fill my can when I need fuel, and that should cure my problem with the tractor.
http://criticalfueltech.com/faq.html not as scary as the article makes it out to be.
 

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I also have been around diesels most of my working life. As mentioned above, it is critical to get good quality fuel, and like kubota I like to add a fuel additive at each fill up, particularly in the winter. I have used both Power Service, and Star Tron, and never had a problem with gelling or algae.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
... I got up to 50 miles per tank more using ... top tiered stations...
My understanding of refineries on the west coast is that there are a limited number of diesel suppliers for all of the brands (I've seen unbranded delivery trucks offloading diesel at branded stations). So that "top tier" for gasoline (and the additives and carbon chain lengths which contribute to octane rating) might not be relevant for evaluating diesel fuel for those same brands. Hence my fallback to looking for large volume dealers to minimize contamination as a discriminator. Comments or suggestions?
 
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My understanding of refineries on the west coast is that there are a limited number of diesel suppliers for all of the brands (I've seen unbranded delivery trucks offloading diesel at branded stations). So that "top tier" for gasoline (and the additives and carbon chain lengths which contribute to octane rating) might not be relevant for evaluating diesel fuel for those same brands. Hence my fallback to looking for large volume dealers to minimize contamination as a discriminator. Comments or suggestions?
large volume dealers to minimize contamination. This is critical for peace of mind. In other words, don't use the little guy around the corner who probably doesn't sell a lot of diesel. This of course applies all over NA, not just the west coast.
 

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My understanding of refineries on the west coast is that there are a limited number of diesel suppliers for all of the brands (I've seen unbranded delivery trucks offloading diesel at branded stations). So that "top tier" for gasoline (and the additives and carbon chain lengths which contribute to octane rating) might not be relevant for evaluating diesel fuel for those same brands. Hence my fallback to looking for large volume dealers to minimize contamination as a discriminator. Comments or suggestions?
many 3rd party carriers carry fuel for anyone. My dad drives and works for a fuel company in Seattle. They sub-contract deliveries all the time. There is a machine at the refinery that you push a button and it adds fuel + whatever brand additives you need. its all automated. Its no harder than ordering a fast food sandwhich.

The main problems come from the actual station not accurate on how much fuel they need.
Example: Station order 100 gallons of diesel fuel. The delivery comes, but only can fill up 80 gallons, leaving 20 gallons leftover. Well the fuel is already paid for, so the fuel driver will put that leftover 20 gallons into the normal gas pumps. Now, you're thinking, that will ruin my car. Well if the tank holds 1,000 gallons and you add 20 gallons of diesel, its watered down enough to not ruin cars. This scenario happens all the time. Premium may get put into normal unleaded, or vice versa.

The other scenario is, a new employee screws up and puts wrong gas in wrong tank. If its enough to just water down, they'll leave it. The station owner may notice and complain, causing the whole holding tank to get pumped. Being a new employee, you're gonna cover your mistakes and your job. The public has no clue, goes through enough gas in their vehicle to never really notice a difference.
 

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many 3rd party carriers carry fuel for anyone. My dad drives and works for a fuel company in Seattle. They sub-contract deliveries all the time. There is a machine at the refinery that you push a button and it adds fuel + whatever brand additives you need. its all automated. Its no harder than ordering a fast food sandwhich.

This is Correct, We have a tank farm local to us and all brands pull in and out of there....

The main problems come from the actual station not accurate on how much fuel they need.
Example: Station order 100 gallons of diesel fuel. The delivery comes, but only can fill up 80 gallons, leaving 20 gallons leftover. Well the fuel is already paid for, so the fuel driver will put that leftover 20 gallons into the normal gas pumps. Now, you're thinking, that will ruin my car. Well if the tank holds 1,000 gallons and you add 20 gallons of diesel, its watered down enough to not ruin cars. This scenario happens all the time. Premium may get put into normal unleaded, or vice versa.

This is complete BS. If UL got mixed with Diesel or vice versa, there would be an uproar. A local station tanker driver inadvertently put "Some" RUL in the diesel tank about a month ago and didn't report it, and they were on TV that night with at least 6 cases of damaged engines from gas in the Diesel. Video showed the wrong hose in the wrong hole...Cost the tanker truck company some big bucks as some of those engines had to be completely replaced... and they did replace them...One guys was 18K.
Mix regular and premium, Ya Maybe... But if it was ever caught... That station could be shut down for Fraud....


The other scenario is, a new employee screws up and puts wrong gas in wrong tank. If its enough to just water down, they'll leave it. The station owner may notice and complain, causing the whole holding tank to get pumped. Being a new employee, you're gonna cover your mistakes and your job. The public has no clue, goes through enough gas in their vehicle to never really notice a difference.
 

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plenty of mistakes or "fraud" happens in all industries at all times. Do they always get reported?
Yes, spills and mishaps happen all the time at stations. There is plenty you don't hear about too. Stop thinking we live in a perfect world.
 

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Well when someone dumps unleaded in your diesel "By Mistake" and it scraps your engine, I'm sure you'll just cover it yourself since hey...It's just a mistake.....
 
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Well when someone dumps unleaded in your diesel "By Mistake" and it scraps your engine, I'm sure you'll just cover it yourself since hey...It's just a mistake.....
You have no idea what a dilution is do you?
If I was to pee into lake superior and you were swimming in it, would you be swimming in my pee? its a pretty big lake compared to my bladder.
 

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So I posted in another post about a recommendation from the jag service dude I deal with. He said only buy your diesel from meijer gas station, as they “have the best gas” and i was told this in order to fix a starting issue I was having. Most people on the forum thought I was as crazy as my service dude that recommended this. After reading this thread sounds like he was right. Thanks team.
 

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His recommendation is not based on anything other than thruput…. Their Diesel is no better or worse than any other, Other than the fact that they may turn it over faster. All Diesel comes from the great big drum in the sky.... What happens to it and how long it sits after it leaves the tank farm has everything to do with its condition and usability. Contamination is the #1 factor in fuel issues and not changing your fuel filter is the #1 fuel related issue with your Diesel vehicle if it starts to run crappy....
 
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