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Discussion Starter #1
I haven't seen any detailed descriptions of Jag AWD beyond the brief explanations offered in the sales brochures. I put on the ICT ASI Suite/All Surface Information display showing the front/rear biasing in the "Power Distribution" graphic, and hit the gas (that is, hit the diesel) while turning sharply onto a dirt road.
Here is what I found:
1) the front drive went to maximum (is that 50/50? It looks like it in the graphic)
2) the bias stayed while driving straight on the dirt road (there was no obvious wheel slip to keep it locked at maximum)
3) the bias stayed while driving straight after transitioning to pavement
4) the front bias immediately went away when turning on the pavement
I guess this makes sense since the car can tell the most about wheel slip when turning, and can't tell if the traction has gotten better when going gently in a straight line so keeps it in that mode until it has evidence that the traction has changed.
Anyone have knowledge or experience on the AWD functionality and detailed behavior? Interested in knowing more...
 

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I have read that is how it works and very recently experienced it on a winding mountain road where I then transitioned to a fairly rugged dirt road at my brother's ranch.

I will tell you that the rear wheel bias with torque vectoring plus the AWD is insanely fun on very curvy roads and gives the driver a lot of confidence. I pushed it pretty hard and never had a real pucker moment. I love my F-Pace for the driving feel. I drove my friend's new BMW X5 and although a pleasant car to drive it is 50/50 AWD as standard and just lacked the drivers feel plus the fun factor you get from the F-Pace.
 

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and just lacked the drivers feel plus the fun factor you get from the F-Pace.
That was everything I test drove compared to the F-Pace. (GLE, GLC, Q5, SQ5, V8 Jeep GC)

We picked up our F-Pace in mid-January but there was really no snow after that that I had to drive in so it stayed in the garage. We'll see how it does next winter. Based on the stories I've read here so far I don't think I have anything to worry about.
 

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From what my Jag Tech friend told me.(20+ years experience)..The F-pace and F-type AWD...Basically under normal dry conditions, Most of the drive bias is to the rears at 90%..then goes down from there depending on the rear slippage
 

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I haven't seen any detailed descriptions of Jag AWD beyond the brief explanations offered in the sales brochures. I put on the ICT ASI Suite/All Surface Information display showing the front/rear biasing in the "Power Distribution" graphic, and hit the gas (that is, hit the diesel) while turning sharply onto a dirt road.
Here is what I found:
1) the front drive went to maximum (is that 50/50? It looks like it in the graphic)
2) the bias stayed while driving straight on the dirt road (there was no obvious wheel slip to keep it locked at maximum)
3) the bias stayed while driving straight after transitioning to pavement
4) the front bias immediately went away when turning on the pavement
I guess this makes sense since the car can tell the most about wheel slip when turning, and can't tell if the traction has gotten better when going gently in a straight line so keeps it in that mode until it has evidence that the traction has changed.
Anyone have knowledge or experience on the AWD functionality and detailed behavior? Interested in knowing more...

Ad 1. I saw that the max is 90:10 but looks like during the start its always 50/50 and than its adjusted accordingly to the available grip.
I am very interested in more detailed AWD specs as well as driving in the snow is one of my highest priorities but after a lot of reading looks like F-Pace is great in snow and its AWD is quite capable. Have a look at
(last 12 min). It looks pretty convincing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
... Have a look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XamuI58I8Yk (last 12 min). It looks pretty convincing.
Nice video. Wish I could understand Russian.
So we can see that it does not have a limited slip differential. And seems to be traction-limited by the tires (which one would expect). Oh, and mud flaps like to scrape curbs when dropping over them. Anything else from the video that I missed?
As do you, I'd like to know more about the details of the behavior of the system; getting it beyond the realm of "magic" should be a big help in knowing what it will do for you when traction is marginal, either on the limit on pavement or most times on dirt...
 

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As I understand F-Pace does have some kind of electronic limited-slip differential. I saw the videos where wheels on one side were slipping and the car was able to move. In fact it was able to move even with only one wheel having traction.
Another thing I guessed from this video is that the chassis is quite stiff. No issue with opening/closing the doors (about 23min). I assume some cars have issue with this and this is why they performed this test.
For the tire traction I will definitely put a set of Blizzacks (or something similar) for the Tahoe winter driving.
 

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For what it's worth, when equipped with good winter tires, the F-Pace is incredible in the snow. I've had many AWD and 4WD vehicles and this one by far takes the cake.

It's good enough with power allocation that it's almost like driving on dry pavement, and the ADSR mode is very sensitive.

We do have Adaptive Dynamics if that makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
For what it's worth, when equipped with good winter tires, the F-Pace is incredible in the snow. I've had many AWD and 4WD vehicles and this one by far takes the cake.
Additional observations from this (very dry and hot) evening:
1) Mild accelerating from a stop on dry pavement has full (50/50?) power to the front. The ICT graphic has both front and back fully colored.
2) Continuing mild acceleration has the power transfer mostly back toward the rear wheels.
3) Backing off the throttle to cruise causes the power to fully transfer toward the rear wheels.
4) Mild braking and then accelerating without stopping does not cause power to be transferred forward.
So the car starts in balanced AWD (just in case there are traction issues?) and then backs off (when it sees that traction is good?). That might help explain the rock solid snow and ice performance.
 
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