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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hope you guys can help answer this. I just wanted to know if the AWD is supposed to kick in when you take off from a stop while driving normally? I thought the AWD was only supposed to kick in when the car loses traction?

 

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I am not an expert on Jag's system, but I remember reading somewhere that the percentages (front/rear) change based on a number of factors. The obvious one is if it detects wheels slipping, but it is more complex than just that. It uses things like speed, change of speed, power, change in power and a few others to dynamically modify the amount of power applied so that it doesn't only react to slippage, but also tries to prevent it so that traction control doesn't kick in and just cut power. Cruising along, it should go to 90% rear, accelerating a little not much change, accelerating a lot more of a change ...

The way I think of it is AWD is always on, and it tries to apply power to the wheels appropriately. Other, more simple AWD systems default to a std torque split and change based on slippage.
 
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My S does exactly the same thing when accelerating from a stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I am not an expert on Jag's system, but I remember reading somewhere that the percentages (front/rear) change based on a number of factors. The obvious one is if it detects wheels slipping, but it is more complex than just that. It uses things like speed, change of speed, power, change in power and a few others to dynamically modify the amount of power applied so that it doesn't only react to slippage, but also tries to prevent it so that traction control doesn't kick in and just cut power. Cruising along, it should go to 90% rear, accelerating a little not much change, accelerating a lot more of a change ...

The way I think of it is AWD is always on, and it tries to apply power to the wheels appropriately. Other, more simple AWD systems default to a std torque split and change based on slippage.
When I'm cruising along all of the power is in the rear wheels. It's just when I start from a stop even if it's a slow start the AWD system kicks in. The video was me starting to about 5mph. Jag's Intelligent Driveline Dynamics is supposed to only put anything above 10% power to the front wheels when it detects slipage. Just wondering if everybody else's is doing the same thing? When I spoke the the sales manager he said his demo only kicks the AWD system when it loses traction.

Skip to 4:38 in the video...

 

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When I'm cruising along all of the power is in the rear wheels. It's just when I start from a stop even if it's a slow start the AWD system kicks in. The video was me starting to about 5mph. Jag's Intelligent Driveline Dynamics is supposed to only put anything above 10% power to the front wheels when it detects slipage. Just wondering if everybody else's is doing the same thing? When I spoke the the sales manager he said his demo only kicks the AWD system when it loses traction.

Skip to 4:38 in the video...
Hmm, I didn't hear that. I heard "when needed" not when it detects slippage. It also goes on to say it is controlled by the intelligent drive-line dynamics software developed in house. So my take is they designed the system to enhance traction and it can be needed whenever they think it is. Did I miss something later in the video?
 

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When I'm cruising along all of the power is in the rear wheels. It's just when I start from a stop even if it's a slow start the AWD system kicks in. The video was me starting to about 5mph. Jag's Intelligent Driveline Dynamics is supposed to only put anything above 10% power to the front wheels when it detects slipage. Just wondering if everybody else's is doing the same thing? When I spoke the the sales manager he said his demo only kicks the AWD system when it loses traction.

Skip to 4:38 in the video...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVtivgBD2Jk&t=331s
Everyones does the same thing (I am not clairvoyant I am just that positive that Jags AWD system is sound).
An intelligent AWD system, like Jags, that can divert 90% power to the rear to make the car feel like a true sports car will automatically send power to the front when you are accelerating from a stop or low speed. The car does not know if you are going to accelerate slowly or if you are going to jam the gas pedal down and rocket to 60, so it is setup to send torque to the front and rear. Like someone else said, the car is setup to do this to eliminate any possibility of the traction control system cutting power. Trust me, it is normal no matter what drive mode is selected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hmm, I didn't hear that. I heard "when needed" not when it detects slippage. It also goes on to say it is controlled by the intelligent drive-line dynamics software developed in house. So my take is they designed the system to enhance traction and it can be needed whenever they think it is. Did I miss something later in the video?
Hmmm. Maybe I misquoted. I'm not sure if it's really needed from a stop to normal acceleration under dry sunny conditions. The IDD software was based off of the F-Type. I think that because people aren't seeing faults in the system that nobody really questions or notices whether they are really getting what they paid for.

Skip to 1:48 of the video.

 

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Hmmm. Maybe I misquoted. I'm not sure if it's really needed from a stop to normal acceleration under dry sunny conditions. The IDD software was based off of the F-Type. I think that because people aren't seeing faults in the system that nobody really questions or notices whether they are really getting what they paid for.

Skip to 1:48 of the video.
Good find. That is a great video. It explains things a lot better than the first, but the first does explicitly say that the tech was derived from the F-type's system. I like the part about the preemptive and reactive systems. Trying to prevent slippage based on the inputs that it has and the ability to react to things as they change or if it detects things slipping. I thought it was explained very well.

Good stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Everyones does the same thing (I am not clairvoyant I am just that positive that Jags AWD system is sound).
An intelligent AWD system, like Jags, that can divert 90% power to the rear to make the car feel like a true sports car will automatically send power to the front when you are accelerating from a stop or low speed. The car does not know if you are going to accelerate slowly or if you are going to jam the gas pedal down and rocket to 60, so it is setup to send torque to the front and rear. Like someone else said, the car is setup to do this to eliminate any possibility of the traction control system cutting power. Trust me, it is normal no matter what drive mode is selected.
I think that the IDD software isn't that intelligent if it has to send power to the front without detecting loss of traction. What good are the sensors monitoring the road conditions every 200 milliseconds if it just sends traction to the front by default. The IDD software is supposed to make the car feel like a sports car and give the efficiency of a 2wd car but the stability of the AWD car when needed. Just my 2cents...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Good find. That is a great video. It explains things a lot better than the first, but the first does explicitly say that the tech was derived from the F-type's system. I like the part about the preemptive and reactive systems. Trying to prevent slippage based on the inputs that it has and the ability to react to things as they change or if it detects things slipping. I thought it was explained very well.

Good stuff.
So am I crazy or what?
 

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I think that the IDD software isn't that intelligent if it has to send power to the front without detecting loss of traction. What good are the sensors monitoring the road conditions every 200 milliseconds if it just sends traction to the front by default. The IDD software is supposed to make the car feel like a sports car and give the efficiency of a 2wd car but the stability of the AWD car when needed. Just my 2cents...
I am not sure I am following you. The second video says that it uses the 2 systems together - sensor input (things like speed, change of speed, power, surface type etc) and slippage detection. It is trying to predict when slippage is likely but still reacts when slippage occurs. Thus providing the efficiency, stability and ride quality that you refer to. I am not sure what you mean when you say "by default". If you don't accelerate hard enough from a low enough speed for the surface type it detects it won't divert as much power to the front at all. It would divert more in other more aggressive driving situations or less stable surface types. I don't see any default set values for the power split apart from the 90%-10% while cruising.

It seems more "intelligent" and dynamic than any of the systems that I am familiar with. How well it works compared to what they say or how well it continues to work over time still remains to be seen. However, I have not seen any indication that there are issues.

So am I crazy or what?
Not sure what you mean. He|| I think we are all a little crazy anyway :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am not sure I am following you. The second video says that it uses the 2 systems together - sensor input (things like speed, change of speed, power, surface type etc) and slippage detection. It is trying to predict when slippage is likely but still reacts when slippage occurs. Thus providing the efficiency, stability and ride quality that you refer to. I am not sure what you mean when you say "by default". If you don't accelerate hard enough from a low enough speed for the surface type it detects it won't divert as much power to the front at all. It would divert more in other more aggressive driving situations or less stable surface types. I don't see any default set values for the power split apart from the 90%-10% while cruising.

It seems more "intelligent" and dynamic than any of the systems that I am familiar with. How well it works compared to what they say or how well it continues to work over time still remains to be seen. However, I have not seen any indication that there are issues.



Not sure what you mean. He|| I think we are all a little crazy anyway :)
On my S it's coming on from a stop when there's no slippage or chance of slippage...even when accelarating to 5mph the AWD kicks in.
 

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Yes, I just tried it in Eco and Normal mode and the power transfers to the front wheels as soon as I touched the accelerator.
 

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On my S it's coming on from a stop when there's no slippage or chance of slippage...even when accelarating to 5mph the AWD kicks in.
This is normal, that is all I can tell you. By default, the system will allocate power to the front when you accelerate from a stop or from low speeds. Since the system can divert 90% power to the front I would think that when accelerating from a stop it may be more fuel efficient for the front wheels to be receiving most of the power, like a front wheel drive car.

Whatever the reasons, this is normal and it is not just your f-pace.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This is normal, that is all I can tell you. By default, the system will allocate power to the front when you accelerate from a stop or from low speeds. Since the system can divert 90% power to the front I would think that when accelerating from a stop it may be more fuel efficient for the front wheels to be receiving most of the power, like a front wheel drive car.

Whatever the reasons, this is normal and it is not just your f-pace.
Ok. Thanks...
 

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Ok. Thanks...
Try turning the traction control system off and see if it does the same thing. If not then I think we figured out that the AWD system sends power to the front because of how the traction control system is setup. If it does do the same thing even with the traction control system is turned off then Jags AWD system is setup that way.

Thats the only way I would think of to see if its the traction control system or the AWD system.
 
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