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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings all,

Since I'm a cheap, I decided to skip the dealer route and change the plugs myself. Although this isn't the easiest thing to swap plugs on, it no were warrants the cost incurred at the dealer and its 100x easier versus a 5.4L Triton.

Labor time: 30-40~ minutes
Spark Plugs: NGK 93476 (these are the SAME plugs JLR uses on these motors and want to charge you 35-45$ a plug)

Tools needed:
Various socket extensions
Swivel socket
T30 Torx Bit
Flat head screw driver
9/16 Spark Plug Socket (not needed but makes the job WAY easier)

Step One:
Remove the plastic engine cover, it comes off by lifter the front up slight and pulling it forward.

Step Two:
Remove the passenger side foam insulator. This can be pulled up from the front of the engine and shimmied out.
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive tire Automotive design Vehicle


Step Three:
Unplug the VVT solenoid and loosen the wiring harness that covers the coils on the passenger side. This can be done by either pushing down on the plastic tabs or using a flat head to assist. The plastic wiring harness bracket will become free and you can move it out of your way when removing the coils/plugs. No need to disconnect any injectors.

Light Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Vehicle

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive exterior Rim

Hand Motor vehicle Automotive tire Finger Personal protective equipment


Step Four:
Disconnect the 3 coils. There is a grey retaining clip that slides up which will allow the plug to be depressed and pulled off the coil. A small flat head or healthy finger nail works to side the retainer up. Be careful to not go crazy and launch the retainer into no mans land.

Electrical wiring Gas Cable Motor vehicle Auto part


Step Five:
Once the coils are disconnected, use a T30 torx bit the unbolt the coils. Once unbolted the coils just pull right up off the plug. Please note, the bolt is not retained to the coil and can fall out.
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Rim Automotive wheel system

Automotive tire Rim Motor vehicle Gas Auto part



Step Six:
Remove the spark plugs with either a 9/16 deep socket or spark plug socket. You may need to daisy chain extensions to help assist. Do not use an impact wrench/gun. The plugs may be a bit stiff so try to use consistent pressure.
Liquid Drinkware Bottle Fluid Drink


Step Seven:

Make sure to always check the gap on the new plugs. JLR states the gap should be .032. The new plugs are torqued to 20nm and the coils are 7nm. Push the coils down on the plug and make sure they are properly seated on the plug.

Step Eight:

Plug in the coils and push the grey retainer clip down securing the coil plug.

Step Nine:

Plug in the VVT solenoid and re-secure the the plastic wiring harness assembly.

Step Ten: Honestly, the worst part. Enjoy wrangling the foam insulator back into position. It has a pedestal that it secures to.

Step Eleven: Driver Side

This side is easier except for cylinder #4. Which I had to get creative with a swivel socket and extensions. The process is the same except for the fact that you do not need to move the wiring harness. What makes it a bit easier is the foam can be pushed downwards out of the way instead of trying to remove the coolant lines from the intake manifold. There is also a bracket that holds two lines to the manifold. Remove the bolt with a T30 so you can move the lines out of you way.

Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Gas Auto part


Step Twelve:

Slide the foam up and make sure its secured. Re-attach the bracket removed in the photo above and install the engine cover.

Step Thirteen: Profit!


Make sure to inspect the new plugs as well. RockAuto decided to be big brain and send my plugs in the very small box with no padding. The gaps were all fine but I noticed Cylinder #3 was missing randomly. Upon inspection and removal, the porcelain was cracked and the plug was grounding out. Lucky for me a local auto parts store had a plug in stock which solved the issue.
 

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Nice write up and photos. I've changed plugs on a supercharged 5.4 Triton too and this looks like a breeze in comparison. 馃槀
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've done my fair share of 5.4's. #4 is the worst.......

The only they thing that makes this process lame is the stupid foam pads.
 
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Greetings all,

Since I'm a cheap, I decided to skip the dealer route and change the plugs myself. Although this isn't the easiest thing to swap plugs on, it no were warrants the cost incurred at the dealer and its 100x easier versus a 5.4L Triton.

Labor time: 30-40~ minutes
Spark Plugs: NGK 93476 (these are the SAME plugs JLR uses on these motors and want to charge you 35-45$ a plug)

Tools needed:
Various socket extensions
Swivel socket
T30 Torx Bit
Flat head screw driver
9/16 Spark Plug Socket (not needed but makes the job WAY easier)

Step One:
Remove the plastic engine cover, it comes off by lifter the front up slight and pulling it forward.

Step Two:
Remove the passenger side foam insulator. This can be pulled up from the front of the engine and shimmied out.
View attachment 74542

Step Three:
Unplug the VVT solenoid and loosen the wiring harness that covers the coils on the passenger side. This can be done by either pushing down on the plastic tabs or using a flat head to assist. The plastic wiring harness bracket will become free and you can move it out of your way when removing the coils/plugs. No need to disconnect any injectors.

View attachment 74546
View attachment 74544
View attachment 74543

Step Four:
Disconnect the 3 coils. There is a grey retaining clip that slides up which will allow the plug to be depressed and pulled off the coil. A small flat head or healthy finger nail works to side the retainer up. Be careful to not go crazy and launch the retainer into no mans land.

View attachment 74545

Step Five:
Once the coils are disconnected, use a T30 torx bit the unbolt the coils. Once unbolted the coils just pull right up off the plug. Please note, the bolt is not retained to the coil and can fall out.
View attachment 74550
View attachment 74547


Step Six:
Remove the spark plugs with either a 9/16 deep socket or spark plug socket. You may need to daisy chain extensions to help assist. Do not use an impact wrench/gun. The plugs may be a bit stiff so try to use consistent pressure.
View attachment 74549

Step Seven:

Make sure to always check the gap on the new plugs. JLR states the gap should be .032. The new plugs are torqued to 20nm and the coils are 7nm. Push the coils down on the plug and make sure they are properly seated on the plug.

Step Eight:

Plug in the coils and push the grey retainer clip down securing the coil plug.

Step Nine:

Plug in the VVT solenoid and re-secure the the plastic wiring harness assembly.

Step Ten: Honestly, the worst part. Enjoy wrangling the foam insulator back into position. It has a pedestal that it secures to.

Step Eleven: Driver Side

This side is easier except for cylinder #4. Which I had to get creative with a swivel socket and extensions. The process is the same except for the fact that you do not need to move the wiring harness. What makes it a bit easier is the foam can be pushed downwards out of the way instead of trying to remove the coolant lines from the intake manifold. There is also a bracket that holds two lines to the manifold. Remove the bolt with a T30 so you can move the lines out of you way.

View attachment 74551

Step Twelve:

Slide the foam up and make sure its secured. Re-attach the bracket removed in the photo above and install the engine cover.

Step Thirteen: Profit!


Make sure to inspect the new plugs as well. RockAuto decided to be big brain and send my plugs in the very small box with no padding. The gaps were all fine but I noticed Cylinder #3 was missing randomly. Upon inspection and removal, the porcelain was cracked and the plug was grounding out. Lucky for me a local auto parts store had a plug in stock which solved the issue.
Absolutely brilliant MFB 鈥 Thank you for taking the time to put this together.

I had my plugs changed as part of the normal five year warranty last free service with only 22,000 miles on the clock ( why not as it鈥檚 part of the scheduled service). To be frank, I am not 100% confident they actually did it because at that mileage they probably didn鈥檛 need doing for another 40k miles and it鈥檚 a pain to actually check. Well, if I do have problems later on I now have a step by step blueprint how to change them myself. Thanks again !
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Absolutely brilliant MFB 鈥 Thank you for taking the time to put this together.

I had my plugs changed as part of the normal five year warranty last free service with only 22,000 miles on the clock ( why not as it鈥檚 part of the scheduled service). To be frank, I am not 100% confident they actually did it because at that mileage they probably didn鈥檛 need doing for another 40k miles and it鈥檚 a pain to actually check. Well, if I do have problems later on I now have a step by step blueprint how to change them myself. Thanks again !
No problem!

No telling if the dealer did or not. When its inclusive service like how JLR does on the 5 year service (before end of warranty) I'd ask to see the old plugs to see how the motors running (some bs so they actually show you the plugs and not make it sound like you are questioning their work). I had a customer a couple months ago that had a massive oil leak which ended up being a Ford dealer neglecting to change out an oil filter (had over 30k on it and he paid for both oil and filter change) and the seal mushroomed out of it blowing oil everywhere. My F-Pace had its 5 year service and the plugs were def not changed.

I owned an XE 20d R-Sport before my F-Pace and of course being a 20d the balance shafts took a crap at 50k miles. I wanted the timing chains swapped (I paid for it) out as well since that is another major failure point. Needless to say they didn't do it and the motor ended up being out of the car 3 times due various issues including them starting the motor of out timing. Sucks because it was a brilliant car but honestly, I lost 100% faith in that motor.
 

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I had my plugs changed as part of the normal five year warranty. To be frank, I am not 100% confident they actually did it.
I had the same feeling that it wouldn鈥檛 be done and asked for the old plugs back, but they wouldn鈥檛 comply with that request. Turns out the mechanic had a question for me and when I went back in the shop he was changing the plugs. I still have doubts they change the pollen filter yearly.
 

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I've been waiting for NGK to release some Ruthenium plugs with the PSPE (Projected Square Platinum Electrode) but looks like we have to settle for laser iridium for now. What oil filter did you go with and recommend?

Any idea how durable the coils are and if they ever need to be replaced? Any worthwhile upgrades for them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've been waiting for NGK to release some Ruthenium plugs with the PSPE (Projected Square Platinum Electrode) but looks like we have to settle for laser iridium for now. What oil filter did you go with and recommend?

Any idea how durable the coils are and if they ever need to be replaced? Any worthwhile upgrades for them?
Oil I use the OE oil from the local Jaguar stealership.
Oil Filter - OX774D its a Mahle filter

The coils seem fine, I haven't had any issues nor have I heard of them failing.
 

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hey thanks for that model code I couldn't find it anywhere in the manual.. any real risk if I went Mann or maybe even ACDelco Gold Pro or is this not something to mess with? I know I have to be careful because Fram for example was only rated for 10k miles and service intervals are 16k so I expect it to at least handle that much life if needed. I'm aiming for every 8k miles.

Both the Mann and ACDelco are more expensive which doesn't mean anything, they're just as high rated on rockauto but I don't want to play with chance if it's really not advised

Also did you have to torque the oil filter cap/housing, if so what did it call for?

I'm shopping for a filter wrench for it so if you can recommend one or happen to know the correct mm size needed for that housing I would really appreciate it. I keep seeing people using a 65mm with 14 flutes but the one I'm looking at is a 90mm with 15 flutes which is correct?


They sell a universal self holding funnel I'm hoping will fit too. Very happy I can do my own work on it, my mechanic friends won't touch it as they don't want the liability and everyone tried to scare me that the oil changes would be over 300 bucks! I'm pretty sure even the stealership is only around 200..
 

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I got this filter wrench on Amazon. Worked fine. Price was $19.90 and next day delivery with Prime. I can鈥檛 remember the torque spec offhand but I found it on the internet when I did the oil change. Something like 20 ft. Lbs but snug and a little more works fine. Just make sure you use a new lubed o ring.
FIRSTINFO 3/8" Drive 90.2mm 15 Flutes Oil Filter Wrench, Compatible with Land Rover & Jaguar - Fits 3.0L & 5.0L Gas Engines
 
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There鈥檚 just one o ring. The new oil filter comes with it.
Just remove the old one from the filter housing, coat the new one with engine oil and replace it on the housing. Very easy.
 
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There鈥檚 just one o ring. The new oil filter comes with it.
Just remove the old one from the filter housing, coat the new one with engine oil and replace it on the housing. Very easy.
thank you I wouldn't have noticed that and I would have ended up putting 2 o-rings by accident thinking one is needed for each side

i'm ready now just can't find a quality oil catch can to install but i'm looking at all available options maybe velocityAP will release one but this looks promising:

 
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