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Discussion Starter #1
I've been trying to figure out the differences between AdSR/ASPC/Low Friction Launch etc and what should be enabled in certain citations (snow, off-road, mud, sand, etc) :confused::

AdSR - Adaptive Surface Response - option with Adaptive Dynamics Package (unless you have some high end trims). It replaces rain/ice snow option in configurable dynamic mode. Works at all speeds and adjusts engine and brake settings in "challenging surfaces".

ASPC - All Surface progress Control - available in all trims by default. Low speed cruise control. It helps to "drive in challenging conditions".

Low Friction Launch - helps to further enhance low speed maneuvering and pulling away from a standstill in adverse conditions. It works better when AdSR is enabled.

There is also DSC, TrackDSC and Torque Vectoring which also have to be aware somehow of the above systems. All of this is little confusing. Maybe somebody can add some details to the above or point to more detailed specifications of those systems.

Some questions which cam to my mind after reading the marketing descriptions of those features:

AdSR/ASPC - from where the systems takes inputs? Is he using the same sensors as the ones adjusting the torque between the wheels (Intelligent Drive Line Dynamics?)

What should be used low speed driving on slippery conditions? Why do we need ASPC while having AdSR? I would guess that take inputs from the same sensors and do similar things (adjusting torque to the wheels with traction).

Is there a situation when both ASPC and AdSR should be turned on?

Why do even need Low Speed Launch having AdSR and ASPC. I am wondering if multiple systems works at the same time (I assume they all should do similar things like adjust brakes, engine, torque) which one takes precedence. I hope that somebody has some more inside info and can clarify those options.
 

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One of the things I've seen in YouTube videos etc, is that AdSR/LFL when engaged really slows your takeoff speed in slippery conditions. It simply will not allow any wheel spin, and thus you may crawl on a patch of Ice or glass smooth snow at a stop sign with it engaged to move out, until you gain some speed and momentum. That is simply not desirable for me personally, that's why I skipped that package. I don't frankly care if I spin a little at slippery stop signs etc, but I don't like the fact of the software controlling the launch. If I have AWD and it is engaged, I can manage everything else.


Please feel free to correct me if I am not understanding AdSR/LFL properly....
 

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I've been trying to figure out the differences between AdSR/ASPC/Low Friction Launch etc and what should be enabled in certain citations (snow, off-road, mud, sand, etc) :confused::

AdSR - Adaptive Surface Response - option with Adaptive Dynamics Package (unless you have some high end trims). It replaces rain/ice snow option in configurable dynamic mode. Works at all speeds and adjusts engine and brake settings in "challenging surfaces".

ASPC - All Surface progress Control - available in all trims by default. Low speed cruise control. It helps to "drive in challenging conditions".

Low Friction Launch - helps to further enhance low speed maneuvering and pulling away from a standstill in adverse conditions. It works better when AdSR is enabled.

There is also DSC, TrackDSC and Torque Vectoring which also have to be aware somehow of the above systems. All of this is little confusing. Maybe somebody can add some details to the above or point to more detailed specifications of those systems.

Some questions which cam to my mind after reading the marketing descriptions of those features:

AdSR/ASPC - from where the systems takes inputs? Is he using the same sensors as the ones adjusting the torque between the wheels (Intelligent Drive Line Dynamics?)

What should be used low speed driving on slippery conditions? Why do we need ASPC while having AdSR? I would guess that take inputs from the same sensors and do similar things (adjusting torque to the wheels with traction).

Is there a situation when both ASPC and AdSR should be turned on?

Why do even need Low Speed Launch having AdSR and ASPC. I am wondering if multiple systems works at the same time (I assume they all should do similar things like adjust brakes, engine, torque) which one takes precedence. I hope that somebody has some more inside info and can clarify those options.

ASPC is low speed cruise control designed for off-road or similar environments. ADSR is designed for traction limited situations like snow, rain, loose road conditions, etc. Low friction launch puts the system into the most conservative state it can be in for very limited traction from a stand still.




One of the things I've seen in YouTube videos etc, is that AdSR/LFL when engaged really slows your takeoff speed in slippery conditions. It simply will not allow any wheel spin, and thus you may crawl on a patch of Ice or glass smooth snow at a stop sign with it engaged to move out, until you gain some speed and momentum. That is simply not desirable for me personally, that's why I skipped that package. I don't frankly care if I spin a little at slippery stop signs etc, but I don't like the fact of the software controlling the launch. If I have AWD and it is engaged, I can manage everything else.


Please feel free to correct me if I am not understanding AdSR/LFL properly....
The issue with skipping ADSR is that comes with the AD package which gives you the electric dampers in general. That package is more then just the ADSR option offered in the drive modes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ASPC is low speed cruise control designed for off-road or similar environments. ADSR is designed for traction limited situations like snow, rain, loose road conditions, etc. Low friction launch puts the system into the most conservative state it can be in for very limited traction from a stand still.

Thanks for confirmation. Just for my curiosity I was hoping for some information HOW the system works. For example when I have AdSR turned on I also have DSC, torque vectoring and IDD (Intelligent Driveline Dynamics) doing their job in the background (at least this is what I am reading). Just here there are four systems which apparently are changing the same things (engine, brakes and awd torque distribution). If so there must be a "master" which controls all of this or maybe in such case AdSR does all the job and the other systems are turned off. All of this seems to be quite complex. Maybe in reality this is just a marketing and all of this is controlled by single module and all what we are doing is just switching their parameters. In my Subarus I just had a traction control on/off and the rest was done automatically without any user intervention and it worked very well in all kind of conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ASPC is low speed cruise control designed for off-road or similar environments. ADSR is designed for traction limited situations like snow, rain, loose road conditions, etc. Low friction launch puts the system into the most conservative state it can be in for very limited traction from a stand still.

Thanks for confirmation. Just for my curiosity I was hoping for some information HOW the system works. For example when I have AdSR turned on I also have DSC, torque vectoring and IDD (Intelligent Driveline Dynamics) doing their job in the background (at least this is what I am reading). Just here there are four systems which apparently are changing the same things (engine, brakes and awd torque distribution). If so there must be a "master" which controls all of this or maybe in such case AdSR does all the job and the other systems are turned off. All of this seems to be quite complex. Maybe in reality this is just a marketing and all of this is controlled by single module and all what we are doing is just switching their parameters. In my Subarus I just had a traction control on/off and the rest was done automatically without any user intervention and it worked very well in all kind of conditions.
I think I got some of my answers here: All Wheel Drive | Jaguar Owners | Intelligent driving technology. Seems like its just a single system and all this acronyms is a marketing.

IDD - Jaguar’s AWD with IDD doesn’t work in isolation. It is completely integrated with all other stability and traction systems including ABS, Electronic Stability Program, and Torque Vectoring by Braking. It recruits the assistance it needs, when it needs it, to keep the car’s behaviour directly connected with the driver’s intention.
 

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not trying to hijack this post, but my ASPC light came on today during my drive to work and will not turn off. Any ideas? There is a hard switch near the gear selector to turn it off, but its usually never turned on when I start the car?
 
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